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Sunday, April 06, 2014

ENTERTAINMENT - FAMOUS ALBUM COVERS RENDERED IN LEGO


Someone’s created a Tumblr of famous record albums that have been “pixelated” and turned into 40"x40” Lego grids. They’re quite nice.

These Lego albums are so well—one might say perfectly—executed that I find myself wondering about the color choices available to Lego users—these covers appear to use every color in the Pantone universe. I suppose if you’re using Lego Digital Designer, you can use these colors.

Which begs the question: Are these actual Lego constructions or were they made in Lego Digital Designer? And if they were made in Lego Digital Designer, does that make them any less real?

The albums pictured here are so well known that I’m not going to bother identifying them—the Tumblr itself ranges more widely across the musical spectrum.


CULTURE/SOCIETY - 11 Sounds That Your Kids Have Probably Never Heard


Who knew that some noises could eventually become as extinct as the passenger pigeon? Depending on your age, you or your kids or grandchildren may have only heard some of the following sounds in old movies, if at all.

1. ROTARY DIAL TELEPHONE

The formerly familiar swooosh as the caller rotated the dial clockwise to the "finger stop" and then the click-click-click as the dial returned counter-clockwise to the start position is now a novelty application that you can install on your iPhones for nostalgic yuks. Adolescents waiting in line nearby will wonder what the heck that sound is, while we older fogies will know you're poking fun at us and our ancient ways.

2. MANUAL TYPEWRITER

Manual typewriters had an entire subset of unique sounds that made them immediately identifiable...at one time. The keys clacked loudly as they struck the paper, the carriage lifted up with a distinct clunk when the shift key was employed, and then there was the ping of the bell warning you that you were nearing the end of the line. That meant you had to lift your left hand from the keyboard and swipe at the carriage return lever, which caused a sort of ziiiiip noise as you pushed the carriage back to the starting position.

6. RECORD CHANGER

Record changers allowed you to stack a selection of albums of 45s (seven-inch singles, not guns!) for your longer-term listening pleasure. Each record would make a soft slap sound as it dropped onto the turntable, a series of clicks followed as the remaining records adjusted into place and the tone arm swung over and lowered the needle into the outer grooves of the record. You'd hear the slightest scritch noise as the stylus settled just so into the vinyl and then (finally!) the music began.

10. FILM PROJECTOR

One of the jobs of the classroom A/V squad captain was to run the film projector on movie days. The rapid tick-tick-tick of the sprockets really was that loud and usually accompanied by shouts of "Turn it up!" and, of course, "Focus!"

11. BROKEN RECORD

Remember when you'd beg mom over and over for something and she'd finally yell, "You sound like a broken record!"? She wasn't referring to pops or hisses, but the repetitive effect that happened when the needle got stuck and played the same few notes over and over and over again.

If you're not afraid of revealing your true age, let us know how many of these you remember from your past!

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

ENTERTAINMENT - And Vinyly Presses Your Ashes Into Vinyl When You Die

by Olivia Solon/Wired UK

Music lovers can now be immortalised when they die by having their ashes baked into vinyl records to leave behind for loved ones.

A UK company called And Vinyly is offering people the chance to press their ashes in a vinyl recording of their own voice, their favourite tunes or their last will and testament. Minimalist audiophiles might want to go for the simple option of having no tunes or voiceover, and simply pressing the ashes into the vinyl to result in pops and crackles.

How does it work? The process of setting human ashes into vinyl involves a very understanding pressing plant. Basically the ashes must be sprinkled onto the raw piece of vinyl (known as a “biscuit” or “puck”) before it is pressed by the plates. This means that when the plates exert their pressure on the vinyl in order to create the grooves, the ashes are pressed into the record.

And Vinyly also offers personalised RIV (Rest In Vinyl) artwork — the simple version just carries your name and your life span, or you can have your portrait painted by artist James Hague, using your ashes mixed into the paint.

http://www.wired.com/underwire/2010/08/vinyl-ashes/

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